Archive for January 2nd, 2012

January 2nd, 2012

Going back into the world tomorrow after ten days straight of watching BBC and reading cozies. Who…

Going back into the world tomorrow after ten days straight of watching BBC and reading cozies. Who won the war?

January 2nd, 2012

thepoetsspace: cleanest gif ever Wow. That’s my friend…



thepoetsspace:

cleanest gif ever

Wow.

That’s my friend Anne with the red hair and trench coat sitting near right!

January 2nd, 2012

Taylor: People don’t like it when a lady calls out a man, amirite Marie?

Taylor: People don't like it when a lady calls out a man, amirite Marie?
Marie: Testify, Tay. Hand me a fresh Zima and let's get to work on our Anita Hill fanfic.
January 2nd, 2012

“When I was reading all of the comments surrounding this Marie Calloway story and Marie…

“When I was reading all of the comments surrounding this Marie Calloway story and Marie Calloway, this figure, this girl-author, I kept on thinking about the major canonization going on of Ben Lerner’s poet’s-novel Leaving the Atocha Station, a novel about a young privileged white neurotic man on a Fulbright in Spain who basically stays inside his apartment, looks up porn on the Internet, gets high, takes benzos, fucks pretty Spanish intellectuals who he doesn’t even try to get to know, and is basically feted in the novel for his poetry. The brilliance of the novel is how aware the character is of his own fraudulence - his poetry, the way he treats women in his life, his English-language, American-culture imperialism. My god though has this book been feted - written about rapturously in The New Yorker, in The New York Review of Books, etc. Since Ben Lerner himself went on a Fulbright to Spain, etc., had the same background as his character, a la Christopher Isherwood in The Berlin Stories, we perhaps can assume the novel is at least semi-autobiographical. But no one asks about his ethics behind writing these encounters with girls he basically falls into and fucks around with, like some sort of Ivy League Kerouac. I don’t argue that there is an ethics for writing the autobiographical. However, those who are all agog that Marie C. wrote about a real, locatable person, insular in a literary scene, must not remember or know the history of modern literature, where this happened all the fucking time (D.H. Lawrence sending up Bloomsbury in Women in Love, Mary McCarthy writing of her affairs, Robert Lowell’s The Dolphin, F. Scott Fitzgerald, the Beats, I mean, I could go on and on and on. And most of the time in modern literature it is the more famous man writing about his wife or mistress).  What I don’t understand, or rather, I do understand all too well, and  don’t like, is why in these situations it is almost always the girl branded as the criminal for the “confessional” and asked to feel bad, to feel guilt or shame for writing the truths of their experiences, are sometimes even diagnosed as being borderline, inappropriate, toxic, messy, etc., while men have written of their affairs and sexual relationships always and their ethics are rarely questioned. This to me is a form of discipline and punishment that we internalize, which is why so many women writers self-censor. You know what it’s called when male writers write of their sexual exploits? LITERATURE.”

The great philosopher Ms. Kate Zambreno breaks it down

January 2nd, 2012

feministfilm: For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see: …

feministfilm:

For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see:

I will add Carol Clover’s Men, Women, and Chain Saws here, although she’s concerned more with identification, monstrous-feminine as men’s horror, and the maternal aspects of possession tales (including a section on possession as oral penetration). Although both Creed and Clover are important feminist horror theorists who work in Psychoanalytical lenses, Barbara Creed talks more about transformation than Carol Clover does. And transformation is key to horror movies about how women are terrifying.

For variations on a theme, watch Ginger Snaps, Carrie, and Teeth together.

(Bonus: here is Kristeva’s Powers of Horror: an Essay on Abjection for free online)

Just because we can say the room represents the womb and Jane’s fear of Uncle Reed’s ghost “penetrating” the room is her obvious fear of male genitals and some other Freudian mumbo-jumbo doesn’t mean we should.” —Jayson Greene, “Sorry, Feminism,” Eyresses

January 2nd, 2012

amatteroftiming: Jeanette Winterson | Why Be Happy When You…





amatteroftiming:

Jeanette Winterson | Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? (x)

January 2nd, 2012

"Illness is the night-side of life, a more onerous citizenship. Everyone who is born holds dual…"

“Illness is the night-side of life, a more onerous citizenship. Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick. Although we all prefer to use only the good passport, sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify ourselves as citizens of that other place.”

- Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor (via rubyvroom)
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January 2nd, 2012

"Naomi Wolf says that “Susan Cain is the definer of a new and valuable paradigm. In this moving and…"

“Naomi Wolf says that “Susan Cain is the definer of a new and valuable paradigm. In this moving and original argument, she makes the case that we are losing immense reserves of talent and vision because of our culture’s overvaluation of extroversion. A startling, important, and readable page-turner that will make quiet people see themselves in a whole new light.””

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Susan Cain in conversation with Naomi Wolf | McNally Jackson Books

Naomi Wolf’s views on the “overvaluation of extroversion” might actually be the definition of irony—michelledean

NAOMI WOLF’S VAGINA HAS A BOOK COMING OUT. And then, the world will end.

January 2nd, 2012

"Touch my skin so I can be myself. Let me feel you enter each limb bone by bone, that what died last…"

““Touch my skin so I can be myself.
Let me feel you enter each limb bone by bone,
that what died last night can be whole today.
Why live some soberer way, and feel you ebbing out?
I won’t do it.”

- Rumi (via terramantra)
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January 2nd, 2012

"As far as I’m concerned, being silent about Hugo Schwyzer or supporting him makes you a rape…"

“As far as I’m concerned, being silent about Hugo Schwyzer or supporting him makes you a rape apologist. Among other things.”