Archive for February 22nd, 2012

February 22nd, 2012

"How is it that one day life is orderly and you are content, a little cynical perhaps but on the…"

““How is it that one day life is orderly and you are content, a little cynical perhaps but on the whole just so, and then without warning you find the solid floor is a trapdoor and you are now in another place whose geography is uncertain and whose customs are strange?
Travellers at least have a choice. Those who set sail know know that things will not be the same as at home. Explorers are prepared. But for us, who travel to cities of the interior by chance, there is no preparation. We who are fluent find life is a foreign language.”

-

Jeanette Winterson, The Passion (via hysteriarama)

she writes my life. a lot of trapdoors lately.

February 22nd, 2012

theswingingsixties: Jenny and Pattie Boyd



theswingingsixties:

Jenny and Pattie Boyd

February 22nd, 2012

"Another principle which grows out of the concept of a tradition and which would also help to…"

“Another principle which grows out of the concept of a tradition and which would also help to strengthen this tradition would be for the critic to look first for precedents and insights in interpretation within the works of other Black women. In other words she would think and write out of her own identity and not try to graft the ideas or methodologies of white/male literary thought upon the precious materials of Black women’s art. Black feminist criticism would by definition be highly innovative, embodying the daring spirit of the works themselves. The Black feminist critic would be constantly aware of the political implications of her work and would assert the connections bettween it and the political situation of all Black women. Logically developed, Black feminist criticism would owe its existence to a Black feminist movement while at the same time contributing ideas that women in the movement could use.”

- Barbara Smith ([1977] 1982) ‘Toward a Black Feminist Criticism.’ in All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave. The Feminist Press. p. 164 (via james-bliss)
February 22nd, 2012

nuditea: looks like it’s intellectual o’clock here at eating dictionaries inc.

nuditea:

looks like it’s intellectual o’clock here at eating dictionaries inc.

February 22nd, 2012

"To be honest, I felt hysterical: that Victorian word for the tantrums of unstable estrogen-addled…"

“To be honest, I felt hysterical: that Victorian word for the tantrums of unstable estrogen-addled women, but that I know actually describes a rage forcibly contained, the hot burn of the involuntary tears, the snap in your composure when you are told for the millionth time that what you feel or think or say or do does not matter. I thought that complex, nuanced, funny, difficult, despicably lovable characters were the emblem of a good writer, not evidence of the insecure woman thieving our sympathies through sneaky writer-succubus tricks. And yet one hundred and fifty years after Edith Wharton wrote a number of canonical, excellent books, some rich white straight dude gets paid—what does the New Yorker pay for that kind of piece, like ten grand?—gets paid like ten grand to come to the riveting, breathtaking conclusion that she might be human, and maybe even A Writer, like him?”

-

The Rejectionist: Special Guest Post: Meg Clark on Jonathan Franzen

I love Meg.

(via champagnecandy)

my brother told me once about some comics character, i think maybe one of the x-men? whose superpower, in a hilarious attempt at “consistency” in the physics of whichever comics universe he belonged to, was retconned into deriving from “punches from another dimensions.” i mention this because even just reading the quotes typed out in this (funny, smart, great, go read it) post made me want to find a wormhole to a dimension full of punches and deliver them all to jonathan franzen. god, what a fucking prick.

(via isabelthespy)

February 22nd, 2012

"It is hard being the attractive one. That is an issue in pop music that people are always willing to…"

“It is hard being the attractive one. That is an issue in pop music that people are always willing to overlook or even joke about. But what does that do to your work? What does it do to your ego? Only who’s gone through the experience knows. But you got to do what you got to do, right? Did Beethoven stop writing sonatas because he had nice eyes? The answer is, he did not. You have to be strong-willed to go through the experience of being the so-called pretty one and walk out of it with your hair and nervous system intact.”

-

Paul McCartney in 1997, when asked for his opinion on the Damon Albarn’s “Prettiness” vs. Blur’s music debate. (via pulsifers)

LMAO.

Having all the girls want to fuck you the most is totes the worst and HOW DARE WE joke about that kind of trauma.

“What does it do to your ego?”

OMG. People.

Just imagine what Paul McCartney’s ego would look like if he WASN’T called the pretty one.

(via thecurvature)

oh my god i can’t stop laughing.

(via isabelthespy)

Let’s face it, we all said things in 1997 that we regret.

February 22nd, 2012

"Yeah … I don’t really mind the label [“feminist filmmaker”], either. I was a very proud feminist at…"

“Yeah … I don’t really mind the label [“feminist filmmaker”], either. I was a very proud feminist at seventeen. But when I became a feminist it was a consciousness raising movement. It was against patriarchal values. It wasn’t let’s go out and be like guys—so it was very bizarre to me when that came up in the 80s, like La Femme Nikita. That’s not what we were supposed to be doing.”

- Interview with Allison Anders (via feministfilm)
February 22nd, 2012

"Women are more open to being taught than men. There are no girl-wonders, especially in this…"

“Women are more open to being taught than men. There are no girl-wonders, especially in this business. But men all think they’re the next boy-wonder, and the industry treats them as if they are. It’s embarrassing. I’ve watched editors who have been editing films for thirty years kiss some young upstart’s ass, and I think, “Why are you kissing his ass? He should be kissing your ass. You’re the one with the experience, he’s brand new. Let’s see him sustain the career you’ve sustained.” They all coddle these boys, and it’s to the detriment of the work.”

-

feministfilm:

Allison Anders, BOMB Magazine

This is really, really important and I don’t think we talk about it enough. The entire interview is fascinating.

Reblogging because this interview is soooo interesting. I need to watch all of her movies, like, yesterday.

(via rgr-pop)

Allison is awesome and also the best. So supportive of other filmmakers, especially non-typical voices, and she does amazing programming around the LA area and teaches. I have to stop myself from asking her for help on every film-related project I do because she will always say yes. All of this by way of saying yes read the interview and also see Border Radio for further discussion. 

February 22nd, 2012

superseventies: The Jam — In The City - 1977



superseventies:

The Jam — In The City - 1977

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February 22nd, 2012

what does the feminist emphasis on getting into upper rings of power *really* mean when control of distribution happens on a local level?