Archive for June 24th, 2012

June 24th, 2012

elanormcinerney: Flower crowns proving popular with the next Så…





elanormcinerney:

Flower crowns proving popular with the next Så Mycket Bättre cast.

June 24th, 2012

not me: Thank you for listening yesterday, and for what you said. You are so strong.

not me: Thank you for listening yesterday, and for what you said. You are so strong.
me: Of course. I'm actually not feeling that strong today, surrounded by wedding bands at work, couples on the subway, I know I will be alone forever.
not me: [no reply]
June 24th, 2012

Clam in one of Liz’s pieces. I don’t know who I am…



Clam in one of Liz’s pieces.

I don’t know who I am any more. There is no part of my life that has value. I keep thinking that I am just trying to survive, to get a breath of air until the next wave. What is the point of survival? Who is the person that went to the Blessing of the Animals? I can’t do anything, I am afraid of everything.

June 24th, 2012

kvltkunt: werqing it out with the state activism.



kvltkunt:

werqing it out with the state

activism.

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June 24th, 2012

"We tell people they are “strong” when we are uncomfortable with their pain and would prefer that…"

We tell people they are “strong” when we are uncomfortable with their pain and would prefer that they shut up and not bother us with it. To say “but you are strong” is telling someone “I don’t think you should feel that way,” and it’s not a compliment. I don’t think that strength means being invulnerable, or pretending that you are. The belief that silence and stoicism are inherently good qualities is how you end up dressed up like a bat punching criminals in an alley – it’s not a good road to emotional health.
[…]
Be sad. Be angry. Let your heart break – in the diner, on someone’s futon, in the park, on the way to the zoo, at brunch, over drinks, in the therapist’s office, on the bus – Wherever it breaks, let it break all the way open, let it run out and down and spread out in a soggy puddle at your feet. Say, “I’m sorry, I can’t listen to you today, my heart is broken. Will you sit with me a while and I’ll tell you about it?“

Say, “I can’t take care of you today, but you can take care of me, and maybe tomorrow I will take care of you, and we can trade off like that for a while, okay?”

Say, “I love you, and I love that you think I’m strong, but I don’t feel like being strong today. I feel like being angry and crazy and sad. Can we go to the movies or just sit here quietly or take a walk or talk about it or not talk about it?“

Your friends may get scared when you do this. If you, the “strong” one can break, what does that say about them? That’s why they push back at you and try to remind you of your strength, when what you need is for them to stand by you in your pain and weakness. They don’t have to solve that pain, they just have to bear witness to it. Maybe they don’t know how – a lot of people don’t know what to do in the face of other people’s pain. They want to fix everything, and if they can’t fix it they feel inadequate. As the “strong” one you can help them out with this by saying “You don’t have to fix it. You don’t have to do anything. Just be with me, and listen, and love me, and I’ll love you back. That’s all I need – to know that you love me, even when I’m sad and scared and don’t know what to do next.”



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Captain Awkward, “The lie of ‘strength.’” (via baddominicana)

That and this are making me feel like Captain Sensible might be my way out.

When you’re dealing with an “overbearing” personality prone to browbeating, manipulation, silent treatment, and/or temper tantrums, absolutely the best thing you can do is convey that you’re perfectly okay if they’re unhappy. Their unhappiness doesn’t scare you. Their negative emotions are their own problem to deal with. You’ll be over here, doing your thing.

June 24th, 2012

internationalsadhits: John Fahey performing for Guitar Guitar,…



internationalsadhits:

John Fahey performing for Guitar Guitar, an instructional show on San Francisco public television, 1969. Fahey had been invited to demonstrate his “American primitive” technique. At the end he helpfully explains that the last chord in the song is lifted from Gustav Holst’s The Planets.

The Fahey Files list three titles for this same tune:

  • The Red Pony - Wine and Roses - The Approaching of the Disco Void

“Wine & Roses is a graceful minor melody learned by Fahey from an old Indian he met while visiting the Mississippi Monner Monument Coffee and Gift Shop in West Heliotrope, Maryland. He was given to understand that the song was an anthem used by the Indians in their heroic struggle on Capitol Hill in the early 1930’s against the political entrenchment of the brief alliance of the Episcopal Ministry with Captain Marvel and the Mole Men.” - from the liner notes by “Elijah P. Lovejoy” for the first recording of this tune, on the LP The Dance of Death and Other Plantation Favorites, 1964. The Rev. Lovejoy includes a footnote: “‘Wine and Roses’ is mistitled, it is actually ‘The Red Pony.’”

“According to Fahey, swinging soundtrack composer Henry Mancini deserves a nod for inspiration for the opening ‘Wine and Roses,’ a moody minor-key testament to the powers of syncopation. After hearing Mancini’s ‘Days of Wine and Roses’ on the radio, Fahey tried to play it from memory later and came up with this tune, which he later retitled ‘The Red Pony.’” - From Lee Gardner’s liner notes to the CD reissue of The Dance of Death, 1999

“I made an orchestra out of the guitar. It was immediately available to me, from Sears and Roebuck… I bought one but employed no teachers. I could tolerate none, nor they me. Would that there had been a wise and quick teacher - one who knew more than the music on the page, on the radio, in the concert hall - one who knew the music of men and women. Perhaps he could have taught me about that instead. I would prefer that it would have been that way. But there was no teacher like that around. So I taught myself all these things, and now I must play.” - from Fahey’s liner notes to the LP Requia, 1967

“John Fahey went insane in 1964 and died shortly thereafter. He spoke to me in his last minutes on his dying bed and said: ‘Take down my old guitar and smash it against the wall so I can die easy.’ I did so and he passed away with a chthonic smile on his face.” - from the liner notes by “Chester Petranick” for the second edition of the LP Blind Joe Death, 1964.

There’s another well documented version of the tune, as Wine and Roses, recorded for the German television show Rockpalast, 1978.

And here it is introduced with, “Now it’s time to go into the Void!”, at the Varsity Theater in Palo Alto, 1981.

“A good piece, but I don’t play this anymore. I don’t know how you write a song that you later find is too frightening to play, but I did. I don’t like to hear it, it’s scary. Open D minor tuning, D-A-D-F-A-D.” - Fahey on “The Approaching of the Disco Void”, as quoted by the Fahey Files in their documents for the album Live in Tasmania, 1981. The Files also note that, “Some Fahey scholars suggest this track may not, actually, be Fahey at all.”

June 24th, 2012

tusha: “They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To” – Mary…


They Don't Make Them Like They Used To


‘caught in the rapture’


‘I decline. I refuse to recline’




‘I decline. I refuse to recline’ by mary


‘long live the dead queen’ series









tusha:

“They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To” - Mary Sibande

Mary Sibande is a South African artist based in Johannesburg. Her recent series ‘Long live the dead queen’ was featured within the city on the side of buildings and other structures as large, photographic murals. The series, like Sibande’s practice as an artist, ‘attempts to critique stereotypical depictions of women, particularly black women in our society.’

June 24th, 2012

theswinginsixties: Space age mod fashions by Pierre Cardin,…



theswinginsixties:

Space age mod fashions by Pierre Cardin, 1960s.

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June 24th, 2012

This is an amazing part of Caprica. Mother, the head of the…







This is an amazing part of Caprica. Mother, the head of the monotheistic terrorist religion, is played by Meg Tilly as in SISTER AGNES FROM AGNES OF GOD. I had totally forgotten. HOW DEEP IS THAT, IT IS A CHUNNEL’S WORTH OF MEANING.

June 24th, 2012

rock and roll high school

not me: Can I invite so-and-so?
me: Of course, invite anyone you want!
not me: Ok, so then also so-and-so and so-and-so
me: Not her.