Archive for September 23rd, 2012

September 23rd, 2012

Photo



September 23rd, 2012

thedailyhavis replied to your post: I went down on my Neurontin dosage, and the voices… here,…

thedailyhavis replied to your post: I went down on my Neurontin dosage, and the voices…

here, have a happy penguin <(“)

This and the four new episodes of Masterpiece Mystery I’m downloading are JUST WHAT I NEEDED.

September 23rd, 2012

I went down on my Neurontin dosage, and the voices went away, but the pain went way back up and the…

I went down on my Neurontin dosage, and the voices went away, but the pain went way back up and the one good side effect, the weird ability Neurontin has to prevent hangovers, is sadly gone. Just two glasses of wine and death.

Tags:
September 23rd, 2012

theswinginsixties: Girls at a 1968 High School assembly. Why…



theswinginsixties:

Girls at a 1968 High School assembly.

Why can’t I get my hair to do that

Tags:
September 23rd, 2012

unicornology: these prada pull-ups are kind of gross/kind of…



unicornology:

these prada pull-ups are kind of gross/kind of amazing.

into it

September 23rd, 2012

theswinginsixties: Peggy Moffitt



theswinginsixties:

Peggy Moffitt

Tags:
September 23rd, 2012

Indigenous Feminisms, Queer Indigenous Critique, and Settler Colonialism in the Uprising at Beautiful Mountain

Indigenous Feminisms, Queer Indigenous Critique, and Settler Colonialism in the Uprising at Beautiful Mountain:

doveilmiosoldi:

First Peoples guest blogger Jennifer Denetdale examines the 1913 uprising at Beautiful Mountain to illustrate how, through cultural and legal processes, the Diné were transformed into ideal citizens of both the United States and their tribal nation that was increasingly modeled after the settler colonial state. Employing Indigenous feminisms and queer Indigenous critiques, Denetdale illuminates the processes by which tribal nations have been fashioned into heteronormative patriarchies and the necessity of engaging gender in discussions of tribal nationbuilding and decolonization.

As the first Diné/Navajo to earn a PhD in history, Dr. Jennifer Denetdale is a strong advocate for Native peoples and strives to foster academic excellence in the next generation of students. Her book, Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita, was published by the University of Arizona Press in 2007. She has published two young adult books on Navajo history: The Long Walk: The Forced Navajo Exile (Chelsea House Publishers, 2007) and The Navajo (Chelsea House Publishers, 2011). The excerpt that appears here is part of a chapter from her work-in-progress on the Navajo Nation, gender, and the politics of tradition. Dr. Denetdale was recently reappointed to the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission by Johnny Naize, Speaker of the Navajo Nation Council.

September 23rd, 2012

"A lot of people don’t heal [from trauma], and it manifests in a lot of different ways throughout…"

“A lot of people don’t heal [from trauma], and it manifests in a lot of different ways throughout their lives. There’s a study they did with Vietnam vets who’d had—clearly—a lot of trauma during the war. Twenty years later, they measured their levels of pain before and after they showed them intense footage from Vietnam. Pretty much across the board, after they saw this really intense, violent footage from the war, their levels of pain went down. Because when trauma doesn’t get to work itself through your system, your system idles at a heightened state, and so getting more really intense input calms your system down….A lot of folks who’ve survived trauma end up being really calm in crisis and freaking out in everyday life.”

-

Meredith Broome (via amstibovvered)

This is fucking relevant to so many people I know

including me, basically

(via anedumacation)

So SO fucking true.

(via hydratic)

September 23rd, 2012

Plus the time Claire made an aside about Salt of the Earth….



Plus the time Claire made an aside about Salt of the Earth. (Only redeeming thing about Claire)

Tags: