Posts tagged ‘activism’

August 23rd, 2013

"Here’s the thing about gentrification. The upside is that there is more police presence, better…"

Here’s the thing about gentrification.

The upside is that there is more police presence, better public schools, your trash will get picked up, but there’s a downside. I’m not going to make a generalization. But, in many cases, when people move in they have this Christopher Columbus syndrome. There’s a great tradition [and] heritage in Harlem, Fort Greene and Bed-Stuy. You just can’t come in and blow up the spot like you been there forever.

My father is a great jazz musician, Bill Lee. Did the scores for She’s Gotta Have It, School Daze, Do the Right Thing, and Mo Better Blues. He’s been playing music in our home [in Fort Greene] since 1969. Now, some neighbor moved in, they’re calling the cops on my father saying he’s playing his music too loud. That’s some bullshit.

No one has ever complained, since 1969, about my father playing his jazz music. Now, this new person moves in, they calling the cops? The cops laugh at them! It’s that type of attitude man. That’s not making good neighbors. That’s not coming in the neighborhood being humble.

Mount Morris Park in Harlem. For years, brothers have played African drums on Sunday morning. Now…they’re gone. That’s disrespectful.

You go to Fort Greene today, it’s unrecognizable. Bed-Stuy do or die. Harlem. Lower East Side. DC’s not Chocolate City anymore.

Everybody in the Lower East Side, they moved to Williamsburg. Particularly, my Puerto Rican brother and sisters, they can’t afford Williamsburg anymore because of hipsters. They moved to Bushwick; pretty soon Bushwick is going to be like Williamsburg. After Coney Island there is nowhere else. After the beach at Coney Island, it’s the motherfucking Atlantic Ocean!



- Spike Lee (via dreamsactualized)
August 22nd, 2013

Selena discussing the focus on appearance and the sexual…













Selena discussing the focus on appearance and the sexual objectification of women in Hollywood

August 4th, 2013

Group Lynching Is Reenacted Every Year in Georgia

Group Lynching Is Reenacted Every Year in Georgia:

Every year, for the past seven years, a group of historical actors and justice seekers reenact the lynching deaths of two black women and two black men in Monroe, Georgia.

No one was ever prosecuted for the killings which occurred 67 years ago in late July, in large part due to lack of witnesses willing to speak out against the killers. For that reason, organizers — known as the Moore’s Ford Memorial Committee — see the event as a “call for justice” as well as a reminder of America’s sordid racial history. Leaders of the committee, like civil rights activist Bobby Howard, believe that at least one of the lynching suspects is still alive in the town.

"We know that one of those people involved in the lynching is still alive," Howard, the narrator of the event, said to the gathering before the reenactment began last year. “We’re going to motorcade through there real slow, to let them know, we know who they are and we’re still watching you.”

The group acts out the killings every year on the Moore’s Ford bridge about 40 miles east of Atlanta, based on what is known of the gruesome events:

Rumors that George Dorsey, a black man who fought in World War II, was secretly dating a white woman in town, prompted a white mob to round up Dorsey and his wife Mae Murray Dorsey, who was seven months pregnant on July 15, 1946. In addition, the mob, led by the Ku Klux Klan, kidnapped Roger Malcolm, who allegedly stabbed a white farmer during a knife fight 11 days earlier along with his wife Dorothy Malcom. The two couples were then dragged from a vehicle, and tied to trees. Afterwards, using rifles and shotguns, the mob fired dozens of bullets into their bodies, leaving them at the Moore’s Ford bridge.

Videos of the reenactment are surely difficult to watch, with local white residents playing Klansmen and black residents playing the victims. While the biracial group of actors lacks period costumes and professional training, unlike most reenactments, this display is about more than just historical authenticity.

"What is happening at Moore’s Creek… falls outside of the normal categories [of historical reenactment]—it is reenactment as a political act," noted public historian Larry Cebula at the Eastern Washington University.

"This is historical reenactment as protest. The reenactors are not only seeking recognition of what happened, they are demanding justice."

August 3rd, 2013

kushitekalkulus: CLASSIC PHOTOS OF LADY BLACK PANTHERS













kushitekalkulus:

CLASSIC PHOTOS OF LADY BLACK PANTHERS

July 14th, 2013

"My heart actually goes out to Trayvon’s mom for being…




"My heart actually goes out to Trayvon’s mom for being stripped of her right to parent her child in a safe community. 10h

June 24th, 2013

lolsofunny: Best response to the “are you on your period?”…





lolsofunny:

Best response to the “are you on your period?” question goes to Leonardo DiCaprio

June 23rd, 2013

‘Public emotions are the revolution’

aloofshahbanou:

Public emotions are the revolution’

June 16th, 2013

art



art

June 15th, 2013

creativenothing: Mother preparing anti-teargas solution for her…



creativenothing:

Mother preparing anti-teargas solution for her daughters who go to protest at Gezi Park.

June 14th, 2013

ladiesupfront: Crying in Art, Part 152 Why were you crying?…











ladiesupfront:

Crying in Art, Part 152

Why were you crying? from the East Bay chapter of the Public Crying Coalition

PUBLIC CRYING COALITION