Posts tagged ‘revolution’

August 24th, 2013

barbreyryswells: East Pakistani women march with guns on the…



barbreyryswells:

East Pakistani women march with guns on the streets of Dhaka in a show of defiance against the West Pakistan military establishment (1971).

(via)

August 3rd, 2013

kushitekalkulus: CLASSIC PHOTOS OF LADY BLACK PANTHERS













kushitekalkulus:

CLASSIC PHOTOS OF LADY BLACK PANTHERS

June 15th, 2013

creativenothing: Mother preparing anti-teargas solution for her…



creativenothing:

Mother preparing anti-teargas solution for her daughters who go to protest at Gezi Park.

April 12th, 2013

"If we actually started calling bullying what it is and address it as racism, sexism, homophobia,…"

“If we actually started calling bullying what it is and address it as racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, fat phobia and classism it would actually give children a better way to deal with the very same power dynamics they will face as adults, while also giving adults more responsibility to challenge the intolerance that is rooted within our society overall.”

- Amanda Levitt at Fat Body Politics (October 5th, 2012)
March 24th, 2013

"The classic trap for any revolutionary is always, “What’s your alternative?” But even if you could…"

“The classic trap for any revolutionary is always, “What’s your alternative?” But even if you could provide the interrogator with a blueprint, this does not mean he would use it: in most cases he is not sincere in wanting to know. In fact this is a common offensive, a technique to reflect revolutionary anger and turn it against itself. Moreover, the oppressed have no job to convince all people. All they need know is that the present system is destroying them.”

-

Shulamith Firestone, The Dialectic of Sex: The Case For Feminist Revolution (The Women’s Press, 1979), pp. 210-211 (via radtransfem)

(JWTPO this was on a 1D blog)

January 21st, 2013

Victims of Revenge Porn Mount Class Action Suit Against GoDaddy and Texxxan.com

Victims of Revenge Porn Mount Class Action Suit Against GoDaddy and Texxxan.com:

cocothinkshefancy:

“I don’t think that society really realizes how rampant it is,” - Sarah, victim of revenge porn

November 13th, 2012

snubbs: “Prisons do not disappear social problems, they…



snubbs:

“Prisons do not disappear social problems, they disappear human beings. Homelessness, unemployment, drug addiction, mental illness, and illiteracy are only a few of the problems that disappear from public view when the human beings contending with them are relegated to cages” -Angela Y. Davis

October 6th, 2012

farahjoon: one time my AP English teacher/journalism adviser/pervert from another planet wanted us…

farahjoon:

one time my AP English teacher/journalism adviser/pervert from another planet wanted us to come up with a creative slogan/pose/theme/whatever the fuck white liberal dix at affluent high schools do with their spare time for our yearbook ad so I held up a sign that said Kill the pig! Cut his throat! Spill his blood! but he said it was “too aggressive” and I smiled and recycled it

Farah is the revolution.

September 12th, 2012

slaughtermoon: fuckyeahmarxismleninism: August 7: Anniversary…





slaughtermoon:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

August 7: Anniversary of the Marin County courthouse rebellion

“On Aug. 7, 1970, just a few days after George [Jackson] was transferred to San Quentin, his younger brother Jonathan Jackson, 17, invaded Marin County Courthouse single-handed, with a satchel full of handguns, an assault rifle and a shotgun hidden under his raincoat. “Freeze,” he commanded as he tossed guns to William Christmas, James McClain and Ruchell Magee. Magee was on the witness stand testifying for McClain, on trial for assaulting a guard in the wake of a guard’s murder of another Black prisoner, Fred Billingsley, beaten and teargased to death.

A jailhouse lawyer, Magee had deluged the courts with petitions for seven years contesting his illegal conviction in ‘63. The courts had refused to listen, so Magee seized the hour and joined the guerrillas as they took the judge, prosecutor and three jurors hostage to a waiting van. To reporters gathering quickly outside the courthouse, Jonathan shouted, “You can take our pictures. We are the revolutionaries!”

Operating with courage and calm even their enemies had to respect, the four Black freedom fighters commandeered their hostages out of the courthouse without a hitch. The plan was to use the hostages to take over a radio station and broadcast the racist, murderous prison conditions and demand the immediate release of The Soledad Brothers. But before Jonathan could drive the van out of the parking lot, the San Quentin guards arrived and opened fire. When the shooting stopped, Jonathan, Christmas, McClain and the judge lay dead. Magee and the prosecutor were critically wounded, and one juror suffered a minor arm wound.

Magee survived his wounds and was tried originally with co-defendant Angela Davis. Their trials were later severed and Davis was eventually acquitted of all charges. Magee was convicted of simple kidnap and remains in prison to date – 46 years with no physical assaults on his record. An incredible jailhouse lawyer, Magee has been responsible for countless prisoners being released – the main reason he was kept for nearly 20 years in one lockup after another. Currently at Corcoran State Prison, he remains strong and determined to win his freedom and that of all oppressed peoples.

Kiilu Nyasha, “Black August: A story of African freedom fighters”

ACAB.

August 10th, 2012

themindislimitless: The punk band Rebel Riot: The band was…



themindislimitless:

The punk band Rebel Riot: The band was founded in 2007 during the period when the military junta cracked down on the so-called “Saffron Revolution” launched by Buddhist monks. Thousands of demonstrators were arrested then, and soldiers were ordered to fire upon their own people. People in Burma are still deeply shocked by these events.

In Burma, punk is far more than just a superficial copy of its Western counterpart. Here, what is probably the most rebellious of all subcultures in the Southeast Asian country is going up against one of the world’s most authoritarian regimes. Punk gives young Burmese a chance to symbolically spit in the face of the hated government, which took power in 2010 in the wake of what was widely considered a fraudulent election. Although the government has shown initial signs of greater open-mindedness, which included the release of political prisoners in recent months, Burma is still far from a state that embraces the rule of law.

From the article Burma’s Punk Scene Fights Repression Underground.